Deutsch Cekzin (Ciechocin)

Deutsch Cekzin (Deutsch Cekzyn; Polish: Ciechocin [t͡ɕeˈxɔt͡ɕin]) today is a village in northern Poland, situated in the Pomeranian province, in the district of Chojnice, in the municipality of Chojnice. It lies approximately 14 kilometres (9 mi) south-east of Chojnice (Konitz) and 104 km (65 mi) south-west of the regional capital Gdańsk. In 2008 the village had a population of 531.

The country village Deutsch Cekzin was created as one of the original seven - later on - so-called Koschnäwjerdörfer by the Deutscher Ritterorden (Teutonic Order). The first historical reference dates from 1338. According to Joseph Rink the villages name might have been derived from the proper name of an old manor house.

In the aftermath of the Peace of Thorn in 1466, Deutsch Cekzin became a royal village of Tucholsky Prefecture. According to the general land survey from 1438 Cekzin had 40 Hufen (a German “Hufe” is old land measurement similar to old English oxgangs). In 1772 Deutsch Cekzin had 64 “Hufen” with 18 farmers. There was also a communal pine forest. In 1905 Deutsch Cekzin had 1,225 ha (1 ha is 10,000 square metres). In the 1905 census, Deutsch Cekzin's 72 inhabited houses had 90 households with a total of 522 residents, all of whom were Catholic. 516 of the 522 residents (99 %) were of German nationality in 1905.

From 1818 to 1920 the village belonged to the Kreis Konitz, which was a county in the administrative district Regierungsbezirk Marienwerder of the Province West Prussia of Royal Prussia. During the German Occupation from 1936 – 1945 to the same county, now called Landkreis Konitz as a part of the administrative district Regierungsbezirk Danzig, Reichsgau Danzig-West Prussia. In between Deutsch Cekzin belonged to the Polish county Powiat chojnici of the Pomeralian voivodeship. Today, Ciechocin belongs to Gmina Chojnice in Powiat chojnice of the Pomeranian Voivodeship.


  Deutsch Cekzin church



Map of Deutsch Cekzin (Ciechocin)



Map of Koschneiderei; Deutsch Cekzin in the eastern part of Koschneiderei